Itinerary: Six Days in Southern Utah

I’m spending some time this weekend sorting through photos from our trip to southern Utah and I can’t wait to share them! This trip is something my husband especially has been looking forward to for awhile. It came from one of those conversations where we ask each other, “If you could go anywhere in ‘X Country,’ where would you go?” This spring we’d earmarked a week for a U.S. trip, and we both agreed it was time to tackle southern Utah.

Utah Road TripGoing in, neither of us knew exactly what to expect, but I have to tell you, this trip has made its way into my top three for scenic beauty. Per usual, we packed a TON into just six days, but we never felt rushed – which makes it a very successful road trip in my book. Read below for a detailed itinerary of six days in southern Utah:

Day 1: Las Vegas, St. George
We flew in and out of Vegas, because it was the least expensive flight from our home airport. We’d both been to Vegas before, so we opted not to spend the night. Instead, we spent about five hours walking the strip, having lunch (at Flour & Barley, highly recommended for wood-fired pizza and an extensive beer menu), touring the National Atomic Testing Museum, and drinking beer flights at CraftHaus Brewery. From there, we drove two hours to St. George, Utah, where we spent our first night.

Day 2: Zion National Park in Springdale, Utah

Zion National Park Observation Point

Observation Point in Zion National Park

We woke up at sunrise, packed our backpacks, and jumped in the car headed for our first national park of the trip. When we arrived in Springdale (about an hour from St. George) we grabbed a quick but hearty breakfast and made our way into the park. Quick tip – the national parks in Southern Utah, like many, require a day fee per vehicle of $25-$30. If you plan to see several, buy the America the Beautiful Inter-Agency pass. It’s $80 and worth it if you’re seeing at least three parks on your trip (or within one year, which is how long the pass is valid).

 

 

Zion National Park Pa'rus Trail

The Virgin River along Pa’rus Trail in Zion National Park

By 9 am, we were on the trail to Observation Point. This 8-mile steep out and back trail is labeled as strenuous, but the view at the top is so, so worth it. After a late lunch at Zion Brewing Company and some souvenir shopping, we went back out for a 3-mile out and back hike on the Pa’rus Trail. This easy trail is flat and follows the Virgin River as it winds through the park. It was the perfect way to end the day in Zion.

 

Day 3: Bryce Canyon National Park, Page

Red Canyon Bryce Canyon National Park

Red Canyon near Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce is about an hour and 45 minutes from Springdale/Zion, so we got an early start on our drive. On the recommendation of our beertender at CraftHause in Las Vegas, we stopped first at Red Canyon, just 10 minutes outside of the national park, where we were able to get up-close and personal with the hoodoos this area is known for.

 

 

Bryce Canyon National Park

Views of Bryce Canyon National Park’s famous hoodoos from the East Rim Trail

From there we made our way into the park and directly to Bryce Point, arguably the best overlook in the area. From there, we jumped onto the East Rim Trail, which winds around the edge of the canyon. In roughly two miles we’d made our way to Inspiration Point, and then on to the famous Sunset Point. A quick shuttle ride back to our car at Bryce Point, and we were back on the road. Our hotel for the night was in Page, Arizona, where we’d spend the following day.

 

Day 4: Horseshoe Bend, Lower Antelope Canyon, Lake Powell, Monument Valley
Horseshoe Bend Page ArizonaPage, AZ is a small town built in the middle of some absolutely amazing scenery. When we woke up, just after sunrise, we went immediately to Horseshoe Bend. We just missed the crowds who’d arrived to watch the sunrise, and had the view mostly to ourselves for the next hour.

Lower Antelope Canyon Page ArizonaNext up, we toured Lower Antelope Canyon. This was SO COOL, and 100% worth the price of admission.

Lake Powell Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Page ArizonaLunch at Big John’s Texas BBQ was the food highlight of our trip, and fueled us up before we drove through Lake Powell/Glen Canyon Recreation Area (also a fee area, but covered by my America the Beautiful pass!). The views here honestly looked fake, as if it was a painting we were looking at. The photos just don’t do it justice.

Monument ValleyAnother two-hour drive led us to Monument Valley. Our first stop was mile marker 13, where Forrest Gump just stopped running. From there we took in the views, pitched our tent at the campsite, and waited on the sunset.

Day 5: Moab, Canyonlands, Colorado River
Canyonlands National Park Moab UtahWe’d intended to hike the Arches on day five, but Mother Nature wasn’t having any of it. After a three-hour drive from Monument Valley to a rainy Moab, we decided to grab lunch and drive through the Canyonlands. The clouds (and SNOW!) at the top prevented us from getting the full effect, but as we made our way back down the mountain we were able to see some pretty spectacular views.

 

Big Bend Campground Colorado River Moab Utah

Big Bend Campground along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

We spent the rest of the day on touristy things – shopping and beer-ing at Moab Brewing Company. Early in the day, we’d staked out a spot at Big Bend Campground, and headed there before sunset to make a fire and enjoy our last night in Utah.

 

Day 6: Arches National Park, Las Vegas
Arches National Park Moab UtahWe woke up at our campsite along the Colorado River, and the sun was trying to make its way out from the clouds. We decided to head straight over to the Arches, and by the time we arrived, around 8:30 am, we were greeted by blue skies. We made the three-mile out and back trek to Delicate Arch, and it was the perfect way to end our trip.

From Moab, it took us about six and a half hours to drive back into Las Vegas. With a red-eye flight that night, we didn’t have much time to spare. But, we managed to sneak in dinner at a place that just really gets me – Tacos & Beer.

 

I can’t say enough about the scenery, the parks, the people. Southern Utah will go down as one of the best road trips we’ve done, ever. Look for more detailed accounts of some of our hikes and activities in the next couple of weeks! Have you been to Southern Utah? What was your favorite activity? Let me know in the comments.

Advertisements

Four Tips to Plan the Perfect Couples’ Getaway

I don’t know about you, but I think there’s something special about taking off on a getaway with your significant other.

10622740_10102543276265894_106475093421040099_nMaybe it’s the teamwork of it all or the hyper-focused attention you can give to each other that comes from being out of the everyday routine. But when I get the chance to go on an adventure with my husband, I feel like we connect in a way that simply isn’t possible elsewhere. Over the last ten years, we’ve hiked mountains, swam in oceans, road-tripped scenic highways and byways and navigated countries where the only words we knew in the native language were “please” and “thank you.” It wasn’t always smooth sailing, but over the years I’ve learned a lot about planning for a couples’ trip that really delivers.

  1. Choose a destination you both want to visit. And if you can’t agree on just one, pick a destination each, and figure out how to make it work. For a recent trip to Europe, I picked my dream destination (Nice, France), my husband picked his dream destination (Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland), and we built a 12-day road trip that encompassed both – plus several incredible cities in Italy. 13232912_10103929722127274_1897117904514656583_n
  2. Collaborate on choosing the activities, restaurants, and lodging. For me, half the fun of travel is planning. I love the dreaming and imagining that happens leading up to a trip as I discover new locations, hikes, views, breweries, museums and more. But if I do it all myself, my S.O. doesn’t get as excited about the trip because he hasn’t had a hand in designing the experience. It’s always better when we’re planning together. 13307444_10103945775176834_2509785730173493827_n-2
  3. Play to your strengths. Okay, confession time. My name is Bridget, and I am directionally challenged. What I mean by that is, I have absolutely ZERO sense of direction. If given the power of making a directional decision without a working GPS program, you can be certain I will lead you in the exact opposite direction of where you wanted to go. Seriously, ask anyone who knows me even a little bit. My husband, though? He can find his way into or out of anything just by guesswork and the angle of the sun, or something. It’s pretty impressive, even if it annoys me at times that he’s ALWAYS right about which way to go. When we travel, and especially when we take long road trips, he drives. It’s an asset for times when the GPS will only speak to you in German or the map blows out the car window. But, in the face of a problem or travel crisis, like, when you get on a bus going in the wrong direction and ride it out for two hours (see above for how something like that might happen), I’m pretty calm under pressure. So when our plans veer off the tracks, I’m the go-to person for reorganizing our itinerary to allow for delays, picking a new restaurant when the reservations fall through, or staying positive when flight times get pushed by 12 hours. 206268_10101033579550214_316457621_n.jpg
  4. Take time to smell the roses. And take the pictures. And drink the wine. I’m one of the biggest offenders when it comes to overscheduling during travel, because the world is beautiful and I want to see all of it. But, especially when you’re traveling as a couple, it’s so important to allow yourselves the time to enjoy each experience. Taking just a moment to sit down together, and talk about what you’re looking at, can make all the difference between a whirlwind of cities you can hardly discern from one another and a lifetime of memorable experiences you’ll be talking about together for years to come. One of our favorite traditions when traveling is to pack a picnic, beer or wine included, whenever we hike in the mountains. When we get to the top, we find a place to sit down, and we take in the view while enjoying our lunch. It forces us to slow down and appreciate the journey as well as the destination.  Trust me, you’ll never regret the hour you spent basking in the sunshine, sharing a bottle of rose while you stared into the valley in the Alps. I know I don’t!270431_10101516123288694_580892092_n

4 Easy Ways to Keep the Travel Bug At Bay

I’ve been home for about two weeks since my last trip, a whirlwind tour of the Pacific Northwest. And per usual, the travel bug has come back to bite me already. But let’s be honest – I don’t have the vacation time or the cash handy to drop what I’m doing and hop another plane.

Instead, I’ll be employing these 4 Easy Ways to Keep the Travel Bug at Bay while I save up for my next adventure.

 

view-from-carew-tower-in-cincinnati-ohio

View from Carew Tower in downtown Cincinnati

Be a tourist in your own city. I live just outside a mid-sized Midwest city, but there’s so much to see and do. It may not be NYC or LA, but new restaurants are opening downtown every week, art exhibits, ballets and broadway shows are plentiful, and the outdoor adventure scene isn’t too shabby, either. In my down time from travel, I find that getting out and about in my city is a great way to do a lot of the things I love, like hiking and trying new restaurants and breweries, without forking over the money for a plane ticket or hotel room.

 

 

red-river-gorge-in-daniel-boone-national-forest

Red River Gorge in Daniel Boone National Forest is just a two-hour drive from my city

Plan a day trip. Where can you drive to in under three hours from your hometown? I can get to three other mid-sized cities, a National Forest, and the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, to name a few. Sure, it can be a lot of driving in a day. But with the right travel partner(s), it’s the perfect way to get that quick fix you’ve been craving.

 

 

looking-glass-rock-in-pisgah-national-forest

Looking Glass Rock is in Pisgah National Forest, just one hour outside of Ashville, NC

Find your go-to weekend getaway. Not everyone is into the idea of repeat trips, but for me, after awhile you know what you like and what you don’t like. And if you can find a place you like within a reasonable distance for a weekend getaway, make it yours. I love, love, love Asheville, North Carolina. Not only is it a quirky city with INCREDIBLE beer, but it’s within an hour’s drive to multiple National Forests and Parks. Hello, mountains! I’ve been in the area three times now, and am planning a fourth trip near Thanksgiving this year. Each time I visit, I find something new and incredible, and until that stops, I’ll keep visiting. It’s under five hours’ drive time, and the perfect weekend getaway for me.

 

travel-planning-tipsResearch and plan for your next big trip. What better way to get excited than to research your next big trip? Sure, it might not happen for six months or a year, but you can use that time to discover destinations you never knew existed, add to your itinerary, or brush up on some useful language skills (if you plan to travel internationally). If you’re planning a particularly large trip that’s more than a year out, researching and budgeting can help you stay focused on your travel savings plan, and you’ll have plenty of time to find the best deals on transportation, lodging and attractions. Traveling and experiencing new things is the best – but planning for them is a close second, in my book.

What’s your best tip for keeping the travel bug at bay? Let me know in the comments!

Hiking Oregon’s Oneonta Gorge

If you’ve ever visited Portland, or thought of visiting Portland,  you’ve probably come across more than a few opportunities for nearby outdoor activities. Just 35 minutes from downtown Portland is a well-known area called Multnomah Falls. It’s gorgeous – waterfalls, greenery, the opportunity to hike up to the top or down to the bottom.

gorge1Keep going – five more minutes and you’ll arrive at Oneonta Gorge. Where Multnomah has multiple parking lots and shuttles that drop you off at the falls, Oneonta has parking along the roadway. And though it’s by no means deserted, you’re looking at sharing the gorge with 50 people vs. hundreds at the falls.

gorge2Let me tell you what’s incredible about this hike.

To start, it’s stunning. Even better, you can get right into the middle of it, rather than snap a far-away photo. Here’s how:

gorge4You hike through the water. No dry paths here! This is the best thing about hiking for me – that feeling when you see something so beautiful, but you don’t have to just look from far away. You can get into the thick of it. This hike goes to the extreme, dropping you into chest-deep water (only for a moment) and leading you straight to the heart of the gorge.

Oneonta Gorge in Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

But first, you have to scramble over these rocks and logs. It’s a bit tricky, considering there could be as many as 20 people trying to go in opposite directions – some are just finishing, while others are just beginning, and there’s only one way in and out. Go slow and be cautious, because the rocks and logs are wet and slippery. And if you can, wear a pair of water shoes with good grips on the bottom. It makes a world of difference. Bare feet on the stones in this river bed? Not a good idea.

gorgeb1Real talk: that water is cooooollllddd. The worst part is the first few steps into ankle deep water. Ever had to ice your foot after running or playing sports? It’s a little painful. But once you go deeper – it’s a gradual decline, from ankles to knees to waist, and then eventually chest deep – it just becomes thrilling, honestly. Look at the smile on my face! I was exhilarated.

gorge3Just after you emerge from the deepest water, you’re in the middle of this gorgeousness. It’s not more than 15 minutes to get there, but by the time you see this waterfall you know you’ve worked for it.

A few tips: I bought cheap water shoes on Amazon that I didn’t feel bad about throwing out – nobody wants to bring wet, smelly shoes home on the plane! I wore quick-dry clothes, and brought a towel and  a change of clothes for directly after. I brought a small backpack (that I had to carry over my head) with very few items. The camera went into a gallon-sized plastic bag, inside the backpack – just in case.

Have you hiked Oneonta Gorge? What other unique hikes have you done? Tell me in the comments!

 

The view of Lauterbrunnen from Wengen

Hiking in Switzerland: Lauterbrunnen to Wengen

While in Switzerland this spring, the number one item on my to-do list was hiking in the Swiss Alps. After all, everybody wants their Julie Andrews moment. And when you see these photos, you’ll be singing “the hills are alive…” too.

13450301_10103993284926914_1447656115062830037_n

Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland

Here’s the background – Lauterbrunnen is a small Alpine village located very near the tourist town of Interlaken, Switzerland. The village itself is quite small, and is known for its waterfalls – 21 of them, to be exact. The town is in the valley, so as you walk down Lauterbrunnen’s only “main” street, you’re surrounded on all sides by rocks, cliffs and mountains.

Just a few thousand feet above sits another small village called Wengen. You can reach it on foot, by train, or by cable car – but there are no vehicles allowed, so you can’t drive yourself up.

13442163_10103993239762424_4527950537158229149_n

Wengen, Switzerland

Wengen is stunning, with its picturesque homes and lodges, but it’s the view it offers that sold me. So, up the mountain I went – on foot, obviously.

To tell you the truth, I never did find a planned path to get from Lauterbrunnen to Wengen, which is VERY unlike me. But, Rick Steves did it, and he told me that the signage on Switzerland’s hiking trails was incredibly easy to follow. So, first thing in the morning, I headed off in search of a trailhead.

I didn’t find one. And German is not a language you can just “wing it” with. After wandering the town aimlessly for 30 minutes trying to figure out how to cross the train tracks, I found a bridge that took me to the other side of the creek and just started climbing.

IMG_4591.JPG

Waterfalls everywhere

Truth time: I consider myself to be in pretty good shape. I’ve always been an athlete. If I had to peg myself on the hiking skill scale, I’d be a solid “intermediate.” This hike had me doubled over, hands on knees, huffing and puffing for air.

My husband? He was doubled over, too. Except he was laughing at me. Thanks, guy.

The thing is, this hike isn’t all that long. It is extremely well-marked once you get across the creek. It’s just a constant uphill climb. First, you leave the main road, where vehicles can still be used. Then, you climb through some farms and fields of wildflowers. After that, it’s a series of (neverending) switchbacks, all the way up the mountain.

But it was SO worth it. Every time I reached a bend in the path, I saw this:

13442332_10103993283245284_8952817729926091768_n

Or this. Look at that view! It just went on and on with more of the same.

13510841_10103993285381004_2007348189123861940_n

Stop it, Switzerland, you’re spoiling me.

Okay, so that was incredible. Could have ended my day right there and been happy. Or so I thought. After stopping into a few tourist shops, I asked an English-speaking store owner (she moved there from the States to retire because SWISS ALPS) where the best view was. See, we thought we found it when we were over here:

13498040_10103993239742464_8629033475033584560_o

Happy faces in Wengen after walking uphill for 90 minutes straight

We were wrong. She pointed us in the direction of an old church, where we saw this:

IMG_4659.JPG

Wait, wait – there’s more. My husband, he just knew we could do even better if we hiked a little further around the valley. He was right:

13465959_10103993251134634_3596935229158954933_n.jpg

Panoramics, people. Sincerely, everywhere I looked I was stunned by the beauty. But we were in search of the perfect picnic spot. After a little back and forth, we settled on a hillside a few yards back from the train tracks. Tell me this isn’t the definition of picturesque:

IMG_4664 2.JPG

Add in fresh bread, meats, cheeses and a lovely bottle of rosé, and we had the most beautiful spot for the most beautiful hour. It was the perfect time to take a deep breath, and take it all in. An hour spent like this is the whole reason I travel, and I couldn’t have asked for a better day, a better view, or a better travel partner.

13450299_10103993284612544_9215058928463790958_n

 

 

Euro Trip 2016: The good, the bad, the (not-so) ugly

It’s been less than 48 hours since I landed on U.S. soil after a 13-day trip to Europe. My sleep schedule is off by six hours, and my house is kind of a mess… but I’m SO happy. This was an incredible trip, and one I won’t soon forget.

IMG_6409

In 13 days, my husband and I traveled to 16 cities in three countries. We stayed in two hotels, one hostel, and six AirBNB apartments. We traveled by plane, train, and automobile (in a rental car we lovingly named Hans – because he spoke nothing but German no matter how many buttons we pressed!). We hiked, we toured museums, we swam in the Mediterranean, we ate everything from swordfish to rabbit to lamb, and we probably spent 100 Euro on gelato and cappuccinos alone. <– To be fair, we ate A LOT of gelato, and drank multiple cappuccinos per day. It was just too good to not.

This experience taught me a lot, and I’ll post about each destination and activity in more detail later. But, I wanted to overview what I loved, what I learned, and what I’d do differently next time.

First, what I loved: EVERYTHING. Okay, it wasn’t 13 days of constant nirvana, but it was pretty close. If I had to pull out my three favorite experiences, it would be these:

The view of Lauterbrunnen from Wengen

The view of Lauterbrunnen from Wengen

  1. Hiking from Lauterbrunnen to Wengen in Switzerland. Holy panoramic views! Lauterbrunnen is in the valley, and it makes you feel immersed in the mountains, surrounded by waterfalls and green pastures. Wengen is near the top of the mountain, and you can look out into the valley for these incredible views. The hike up was, in a word, difficult. It was 90 minutes of winding up, up, up the side of a mountain, after all. But when you arrive and catch this view? Totally worth it. We spent an hour picnicking just off the trail where we could eat baguettes and drink rosé from the bottle while taking it all in.

    Perfect spot for a picnic in Switzerland

    Perfect spot for a picnic in Switzerland

  2. A day at the beach in VilleFranche sur Mer. The water actually is that color, in case you were wondering. This incredible beach (and adorable town) is about a 3-mile walk from Nice’s Vielle Ville, where we stayed. The views along the way were spectacular, the crystal blue waters and pebbled beach the perfect reward for the work to get there. As was common on this trip, we brought along a bottle of rosé to sip on at the beach. Sensing a theme here? The sun was shining, it was a perfect 73 degrees, and it made for an absolutely incredible day.

    IMG_6692

    VilleFranche sur Mer in the south of France

  3. One day in Florence, Italy. This was somewhat unexpected, simply because I didn’t do a lot of planning for Florence. I had three things on my list: the Bardini Gardens, the statue of David, and dinner at Osteria del Cinghale Bianco. The gardens were STUNNING. It was so relaxing to walk through rows of flowers and beautifully manicured green spaces. There’s a terrace with a lovely view of the city, too.
    IMG_5008

    The Bardini Gardens in Florence, Italy

    After the gardens, we stopped for gelato (again) and walked through town toward Galleria dell’Academia, where David lives. And we ended up right next to the Duomo. Have you ever seen such incredible detail on a building?

    IMG_6918

    The Duomo in Florence, Italy

    After we hung out with David for a bit (quick tip: skip the line by reserving your tickets online in advance – it’s way worth it!), we stopped in at Piazza de Michaelangelo for this incredible panoramic view.

    Florence, Italy

    Florence, Italy

    After the best damn glass of prosecco I’ve ever had (we brought home a bottle, it was so good) we had our authentic Italian dinner we’ve been dreaming about for years. And it was the Best. Meal. Ever. Literally, I’ve never had a better meal. Cacio e pepe, wild boar ragu, sliced sirloin, panna cotta with wild berries, and a cappuccino to round things out. Oh, and a half liter of the house red. I left there smiling ear-to-ear.

    First course: Cacio e Pepe and Wild Boar Ragu with the House Red.

    First course: Cacio e Pepe and Wild Boar Ragu with the House Red.

Now, for a few lessons learned.

  1. Driving a rental car in a foreign country, even on the right side of the road, is stressful. Like, seriously stressful. Why are all the parking garages in Europe so small? No wonder the rep at the Sixt counter looked at us so incredulously when we told her “No, thank you,” on the additional damage coverage. And researching the rules of the road was not on my list of tasks to complete before heading across the Atlantic – but it should have been. Ever heard of a rotary? K, now drive around one every 200 meters. And don’t get hit by oncoming traffic, even though they don’t use signals, ever. This wasn’t your average road trip.

    Trying to put on a happy face as it rained for 48 hours straight. Photo taken in Annecy, France.

    Trying to put on a happy face as it rained for 48 hours straight. Photo taken in Annecy, France.

  2. The weather doesn’t care that you planned your entire trip around hiking some of the most beautiful trails in the world. I’m an eternal optimist, so I just assumed that Mother Nature would do me a solid and make it sunny and bright on my hiking days. And my beach days. And my touristy days. Hence, my lack of a plan B when it rained buckets in Chamonix, and Annecy, and Cinque Terre. Here’s where flexibility and positivity comes in handy – because you can either sit and wallow or go find a new adventure. And that’s just what we did.
  3. You don’t have to speak the language fluently – but trying your best goes a long way. I speak zero German, very rough French, and not a bit of Italian. I found that in Switzerland, I could get through most interactions with “guten tag,” “danke” and a smile and a nod, but we didn’t eat out much, and spent nearly all our time in the mountains. In France, avoiding conversation was much harder. I tried my best to order food or make dinner reservations with my rusty language skills, and I found that it did make a big difference in my interactions, and in the service we received.
Pisa, Italy

Pisa, Italy

What would I do differently? Not much. I’d consider doing the whole trip by train, for sure. And I’d probably pack more pants and long-sleeved shirts because it’s chilly at night when you’re on the coast, even in June. But I consider every moment a piece of what made my trip the incredible experience that it was, and honestly, sometimes the best moments are the ones that you don’t plan on at all.

Jordan Pond in Acadia National Park

Hiking in Acadia National Park

Fall on the east coast is incomparable, and travelers from all across the country head to New England in October to chase the colorful leaves down the coast. Leef peepers often start in Maine and drive south to capture photos of the season’s most beautiful colors.

Autumn in Maine

This past fall, I was lucky enough to time a trip to the onset of fall foliage in Maine, and take some gorgeous photos during a hike in Acadia National Park. It was the weekend after Columbus Day – which is typically a very busy tourist time in Massachusetts and Maine. By that next weekend, most tourists had departed but the colors were just reaching their peak.

Acadia National Park in Maine

I hiked in Acadia on the tail end of a road trip from Boston to Bar Harbor, and after gorging myself on lobster rolls and clam chowder, I was ready for a longer, more strenuous hike.

Pemetic Mountain, South Ridge Trail Loop – 6 miles, advanced

Acadia’s mountains were different from any I’ve hiked in the past. These beauties are forested near the base, but as you climb higher, they open up to stunning granite formations. Hiking up Pemetic Mountain on the South Ridge Trail Loop takes you on a path around Jordan Pond, through the forest, and finally up above the evergreens. By the time I reached what I thought would be the summit, I had to take a breather and enjoy the gorgeous views.

Acadia National Park

After another half hour’s climb, I reached a clearing and this stunning vista.

Acadia National Park

But wait, there’s more! Keep trekking up and over the final hill to the highest point, and here’s what’s in store:

Pemetic Mountain in Acadia National Park

My husband, Mike, at the tip top of Pemetic Mountain in Acadia National Park

Rather than backtrack down South Ridge Trail, I decided to follow the connecting North Ridge Trail down the  mountain, so that I could take the famed Carriage Roads back to the Jordan Pond lot where the car was parked. I would share a photo, but I was too busy concentrating on not doing permanent damage to my knees, or falling flat on my face to snap a shot of the descent. That trail was STEEP. Take your time on the way down, and move as slowly as you need to. From jumping off of boulders and cursing myself for not bringing a walking stick, it was tense at times. But, I made it in one piece.

And boy, were those carriage roads worth the trip! So charming I forgot to take a photo. What kind of blogger am I, anyway? You can read more about the carriage roads here. Another quick 1.5 miles later, I’d reached my car and the Jordan Pond parking lot.

 

Acadia National Park

Hey, I made it! This is my super happy face after finishing the five-hour trip up and down Pemetic Mountain. Enjoying Maine’s incredible coastal views.

This hike was one of the more difficult hikes I’ve encountered, mostly due to the steep decline. But the views were oh so worth it. All in all, it took me five hours, with many breaks and time spent sitting down to enjoy the panorama of Maine in October.

What’s your favorite trail in Acadia National Park? Let me know in the comments!