Hiking Oregon’s Oneonta Gorge

If you’ve ever visited Portland, or thought of visiting Portland,  you’ve probably come across more than a few opportunities for nearby outdoor activities. Just 35 minutes from downtown Portland is a well-known area called Multnomah Falls. It’s gorgeous – waterfalls, greenery, the opportunity to hike up to the top or down to the bottom.

gorge1Keep going – five more minutes and you’ll arrive at Oneonta Gorge. Where Multnomah has multiple parking lots and shuttles that drop you off at the falls, Oneonta has parking along the roadway. And though it’s by no means deserted, you’re looking at sharing the gorge with 50 people vs. hundreds at the falls.

gorge2Let me tell you what’s incredible about this hike.

To start, it’s stunning. Even better, you can get right into the middle of it, rather than snap a far-away photo. Here’s how:

gorge4You hike through the water. No dry paths here! This is the best thing about hiking for me – that feeling when you see something so beautiful, but you don’t have to just look from far away. You can get into the thick of it. This hike goes to the extreme, dropping you into chest-deep water (only for a moment) and leading you straight to the heart of the gorge.

Oneonta Gorge in Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

But first, you have to scramble over these rocks and logs. It’s a bit tricky, considering there could be as many as 20 people trying to go in opposite directions – some are just finishing, while others are just beginning, and there’s only one way in and out. Go slow and be cautious, because the rocks and logs are wet and slippery. And if you can, wear a pair of water shoes with good grips on the bottom. It makes a world of difference. Bare feet on the stones in this river bed? Not a good idea.

gorgeb1Real talk: that water is cooooollllddd. The worst part is the first few steps into ankle deep water. Ever had to ice your foot after running or playing sports? It’s a little painful. But once you go deeper – it’s a gradual decline, from ankles to knees to waist, and then eventually chest deep – it just becomes thrilling, honestly. Look at the smile on my face! I was exhilarated.

gorge3Just after you emerge from the deepest water, you’re in the middle of this gorgeousness. It’s not more than 15 minutes to get there, but by the time you see this waterfall you know you’ve worked for it.

A few tips: I bought cheap water shoes on Amazon that I didn’t feel bad about throwing out – nobody wants to bring wet, smelly shoes home on the plane! I wore quick-dry clothes, and brought a towel and  a change of clothes for directly after. I brought a small backpack (that I had to carry over my head) with very few items. The camera went into a gallon-sized plastic bag, inside the backpack – just in case.

Have you hiked Oneonta Gorge? What other unique hikes have you done? Tell me in the comments!

 

The view of Lauterbrunnen from Wengen

Hiking in Switzerland: Lauterbrunnen to Wengen

While in Switzerland this spring, the number one item on my to-do list was hiking in the Swiss Alps. After all, everybody wants their Julie Andrews moment. And when you see these photos, you’ll be singing “the hills are alive…” too.

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Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland

Here’s the background – Lauterbrunnen is a small Alpine village located very near the tourist town of Interlaken, Switzerland. The village itself is quite small, and is known for its waterfalls – 21 of them, to be exact. The town is in the valley, so as you walk down Lauterbrunnen’s only “main” street, you’re surrounded on all sides by rocks, cliffs and mountains.

Just a few thousand feet above sits another small village called Wengen. You can reach it on foot, by train, or by cable car – but there are no vehicles allowed, so you can’t drive yourself up.

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Wengen, Switzerland

Wengen is stunning, with its picturesque homes and lodges, but it’s the view it offers that sold me. So, up the mountain I went – on foot, obviously.

To tell you the truth, I never did find a planned path to get from Lauterbrunnen to Wengen, which is VERY unlike me. But, Rick Steves did it, and he told me that the signage on Switzerland’s hiking trails was incredibly easy to follow. So, first thing in the morning, I headed off in search of a trailhead.

I didn’t find one. And German is not a language you can just “wing it” with. After wandering the town aimlessly for 30 minutes trying to figure out how to cross the train tracks, I found a bridge that took me to the other side of the creek and just started climbing.

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Waterfalls everywhere

Truth time: I consider myself to be in pretty good shape. I’ve always been an athlete. If I had to peg myself on the hiking skill scale, I’d be a solid “intermediate.” This hike had me doubled over, hands on knees, huffing and puffing for air.

My husband? He was doubled over, too. Except he was laughing at me. Thanks, guy.

The thing is, this hike isn’t all that long. It is extremely well-marked once you get across the creek. It’s just a constant uphill climb. First, you leave the main road, where vehicles can still be used. Then, you climb through some farms and fields of wildflowers. After that, it’s a series of (neverending) switchbacks, all the way up the mountain.

But it was SO worth it. Every time I reached a bend in the path, I saw this:

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Or this. Look at that view! It just went on and on with more of the same.

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Stop it, Switzerland, you’re spoiling me.

Okay, so that was incredible. Could have ended my day right there and been happy. Or so I thought. After stopping into a few tourist shops, I asked an English-speaking store owner (she moved there from the States to retire because SWISS ALPS) where the best view was. See, we thought we found it when we were over here:

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Happy faces in Wengen after walking uphill for 90 minutes straight

We were wrong. She pointed us in the direction of an old church, where we saw this:

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Wait, wait – there’s more. My husband, he just knew we could do even better if we hiked a little further around the valley. He was right:

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Panoramics, people. Sincerely, everywhere I looked I was stunned by the beauty. But we were in search of the perfect picnic spot. After a little back and forth, we settled on a hillside a few yards back from the train tracks. Tell me this isn’t the definition of picturesque:

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Add in fresh bread, meats, cheeses and a lovely bottle of rosé, and we had the most beautiful spot for the most beautiful hour. It was the perfect time to take a deep breath, and take it all in. An hour spent like this is the whole reason I travel, and I couldn’t have asked for a better day, a better view, or a better travel partner.

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Jordan Pond in Acadia National Park

Hiking in Acadia National Park

Fall on the east coast is incomparable, and travelers from all across the country head to New England in October to chase the colorful leaves down the coast. Leef peepers often start in Maine and drive south to capture photos of the season’s most beautiful colors.

Autumn in Maine

This past fall, I was lucky enough to time a trip to the onset of fall foliage in Maine, and take some gorgeous photos during a hike in Acadia National Park. It was the weekend after Columbus Day – which is typically a very busy tourist time in Massachusetts and Maine. By that next weekend, most tourists had departed but the colors were just reaching their peak.

Acadia National Park in Maine

I hiked in Acadia on the tail end of a road trip from Boston to Bar Harbor, and after gorging myself on lobster rolls and clam chowder, I was ready for a longer, more strenuous hike.

Pemetic Mountain, South Ridge Trail Loop – 6 miles, advanced

Acadia’s mountains were different from any I’ve hiked in the past. These beauties are forested near the base, but as you climb higher, they open up to stunning granite formations. Hiking up Pemetic Mountain on the South Ridge Trail Loop takes you on a path around Jordan Pond, through the forest, and finally up above the evergreens. By the time I reached what I thought would be the summit, I had to take a breather and enjoy the gorgeous views.

Acadia National Park

After another half hour’s climb, I reached a clearing and this stunning vista.

Acadia National Park

But wait, there’s more! Keep trekking up and over the final hill to the highest point, and here’s what’s in store:

Pemetic Mountain in Acadia National Park

My husband, Mike, at the tip top of Pemetic Mountain in Acadia National Park

Rather than backtrack down South Ridge Trail, I decided to follow the connecting North Ridge Trail down the  mountain, so that I could take the famed Carriage Roads back to the Jordan Pond lot where the car was parked. I would share a photo, but I was too busy concentrating on not doing permanent damage to my knees, or falling flat on my face to snap a shot of the descent. That trail was STEEP. Take your time on the way down, and move as slowly as you need to. From jumping off of boulders and cursing myself for not bringing a walking stick, it was tense at times. But, I made it in one piece.

And boy, were those carriage roads worth the trip! So charming I forgot to take a photo. What kind of blogger am I, anyway? You can read more about the carriage roads here. Another quick 1.5 miles later, I’d reached my car and the Jordan Pond parking lot.

 

Acadia National Park

Hey, I made it! This is my super happy face after finishing the five-hour trip up and down Pemetic Mountain. Enjoying Maine’s incredible coastal views.

This hike was one of the more difficult hikes I’ve encountered, mostly due to the steep decline. But the views were oh so worth it. All in all, it took me five hours, with many breaks and time spent sitting down to enjoy the panorama of Maine in October.

What’s your favorite trail in Acadia National Park? Let me know in the comments!

Hiking the Rocky Mountains for Beginners

Hiking the Rockies for Beginners

If you’re like me, you can’t just stare at the mountains – you have to go into them to explore. Denver makes a terrific home base for exploring the Rockies, and it’s in proximity to tons of hikes suitable for beginner and intermediate hikers. Here are just a few of the trails I recommend:

Dream Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park – 2.2 miles, easy

Hiking in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park is perhaps the most popular hiking area for visiting travelers because it’s so well-known. What makes it even better is the easy access to hiking trails. When you drive into the park (it’s about an hour from downtown Denver) you pay the toll and head straight in. To reach the trailhead that leads you to Dream Lake, you’ll drive along Bear Lake Road and look for signs for a Park and Ride lot. Especially during peak season (May through September), the parking lots fill before 10 am. The Park and Ride lot is equipped with really nice restrooms, water fountains, and a line for the free shuttle bus. Quick tip – the line for the shuttle bus can be quite long, but it moves fairly quickly. Getting an earlier start makes wait times lower and trail traffic less intense. However, this is a well-loved, and highly-traveled trail – so you shouldn’t expect to find yourself alone in the wilderness. There’s plenty of beauty, peace and quiet for all, though.

Dream Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

Dream Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

The shuttle bus will take you further up into the park, and drop you off at the Bear Lake Trailhead. From Bear Lake, the trail splits – take it to the left toward Dream Lake. The trail climbs steadily up toward Nymph Lake, which makes a terrific spot to rest and take in the views. Continue around the lake and head up the steep climb that will offer you incredible views on your way up. Your next landmark is the trailhead for Lake Haiyaha. Turn right here to continue to Dream Lake, and enjoy the beautiful scene laid out before you. When I visited (in late September at the peak of fall colors) I sat on the boulders in front of the lake and had a picnic lunch, before heading back to the Lake Haiyaha trailhead and looping around to find it. I had more time and energy, and it was a convenient add-on.

Trading Post Trail at Red Rocks Park and Amphitheater – 1.4 miles, easy

Red Rocks Park and Amphitheater

Red Rocks is known for its amphitheater and the incredible concerts it hosts, but there are also some beautiful hiking trails connected to the park. Trading Post Trail showcases the incredible rock formations, valleys, meadows, and more. The terrain is a little rough, so even though it’s just over one mile long, I recommend hiking shoes. While you’re there, take the time to walk the amphitheater steps and take in the views from the top. It’s truly stunning.

Red Rocks Park and Amphitheater

Lake Isabelle in Indian Peaks Wilderness – 4 miles, intermediate

Lake Isabelle Trail in Indian Peaks Wilderness Area

The trail to Lake Isabelle was a favorite for me, because it was more wild than the other trails. Terrain ranged from lush forest to boulders and stones littering creekbeds that flowed down the mountain. Plus, I saw a moose IRL (from a distance). Located in the Lake Brainard area just outside of Boulder, the hike to Lake Isabelle is stunning. After a quick stroll around Long Lake, simply follow the signs across valleys and streams for two miles to reach Lake Isabelle. This hike only gains 400 feet in elevation, but it had my heart pumping. When you arrive at the top, expect wildflowers, spectacular views, and even a bit of snow – it’s generally found here year-round.

Lake Isabelle Trail in Indian Peaks Wilderness Area

Lake Isabelle in Indian Peaks Wilderness

Lake Isabelle

You can tack on an additional two miles and 1,500 feet in elevation from Lake Isabelle to reach the Isabelle Glacier if you have the time and energy – I opted to head back, and backtracked the two miles to my car.

If you decide to make Denver your home base, be sure to check out the local food and beer scene – after a few hours hiking in the mountains, I thoroughly enjoyed replenishing those spent calories at The Populist, Hops and Pie, Great Divide Brewing Company, River North Brewing Company, and Our Mutual Friend, to name a few.